Trump’s lawyers ask judge to keep key documents from Mueller’s office

By Laura Jarrett and Natasha Korecki President Donald Trump’s attorneys have asked a judge to prevent the special counsel’s office from accessing certain documents from the White House, according to a court filing published…

Trump's lawyers ask judge to keep key documents from Mueller's office

By Laura Jarrett and Natasha Korecki

President Donald Trump’s attorneys have asked a judge to prevent the special counsel’s office from accessing certain documents from the White House, according to a court filing published Monday by CNN.

The document provides a partial list of documents Trump’s legal team is seeking to keep from special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, including any of his drafts of statements Trump is expected to make to the House of Representatives on Tuesday, the contents of two of the President’s communications from August 2017 that he planned to submit to the House, and the contents of a July 19, 2017, memo from former White House counsel Don McGahn to Trump from which the President sought to exclude portions.

As for when Mueller might seek to obtain those documents, attorney Jay Sekulow wrote that “we understand that Mr. Mueller would be interested in obtaining the documents … at some point in the future, and we would be happy to supply them voluntarily.”

Sekulow said the President’s outside legal team would “receive a notice of production from the office of the special counsel at that time” and said, “I would then be in a position to share those materials with the President.”

For now, Sekulow said, Trump remains “fully cooperative and I don’t think it’s been asked to do anything that we haven’t agreed to under those circumstances.”

Other documents that the White House is seeking to keep from Mueller include:

— Text messages between former White House strategist Steve Bannon and Trump deputy chief of staff for communications, Bill Shine.

— Bannon’s draft of an August 2017 statement to the House Oversight Committee on Russian interference in the 2016 election that the White House said he “gave to the White House Counsel before making it public.”

— Two of the president’s texts from his first meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin in May 2017, during which the two men discussed the conflicts in Syria.

— Statements from Trump regarding then-FBI Director James Comey’s firing, in which Trump “cited the Russia investigation as one of the contributing factors.”

— A July 6, 2017, memo from McGahn to Trump, dated hours after Trump fired Comey, that Trump sought to remove portions of the memo in which he expresses concern over a meeting that Comey held with Christopher Wray, then-the FBI director, the contents of which he had not authorized. McGahn did not include such portions.

— A transcript of a June 9, 2017, meeting between George Papadopoulos, Trump’s former campaign foreign policy adviser, and Joseph Mifsud, a Maltese professor who later pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI, at which Papadopoulos had discussed setting up meetings between Trump and the Kremlin. Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI.

— The private first lady’s account of last March’s Central Park rally in which Melania Trump offered a proclamation that depicted “my husband in a very positive light.” At the rally, President Trump described his welcome from the crowd as “the greatest reception” of his life.

— The U.S. Attorneys’ Manual that outlined the scope of a pardon of Mifsud.

— Documents regarding former national security adviser Michael Flynn, including “any conversations with him or any other officials regarding the Mueller investigation or Russia.”

— Documents regarding Comey and several others who allegedly participated in his firing, including former acting Attorney General Sally Yates, former CIA Director John Brennan, former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, former FBI Director James Comey, former deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabe, former White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci, former Trump Organization CFO Allen Weisselberg, and former White House Counsel Don McGahn.

— A schedule of this past spring’s meetings between Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

— Trump’s response to a 1991 letter from Richard Nixon opposing the release of transcripts of his conversations with then-Attorney General John Mitchell, including one that revealed the president had discussed sending operatives to bolster support for the Soviet Union, among other contents.

— Trump’s original draft of a statement to the House Oversight Committee on Russian interference in the 2016 election.

— Notes from a secret meeting between the president, retired Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley, national security adviser H.R. McMaster, Trump Jr., and Jared Kushner in Trump Tower last June. Kushner and Kushner’s attorney Abbe Lowell attended the meeting.

— Emails from Jeff Sessions on his meetings with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

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