The internet of things is finally getting smarter

The global internet of things and powerful computing power make it possible to do mapping that no company ever had before. This may sound far-fetched, but it’s already happening in a few places. Some…

The internet of things is finally getting smarter

The global internet of things and powerful computing power make it possible to do mapping that no company ever had before. This may sound far-fetched, but it’s already happening in a few places. Some companies have successfully built 3D maps of the country’s railroads. Google Transit has long offered timely information about bus routes. And California is in the middle of building a 3D underground map of traffic patterns and driving behaviour.

The latest company on the map is LimTrust, a mapping analytics startup in Palo Alto, California, and a winner of this year’s Halo Awards for invention. LimTrust has built a sophisticated algorithm that knows when devices need to be physically connected to a network and where they should be next to the internet in order to send information to computers and receive data back. That data can tell people that the cable or phone cable is out of service, or that the computer needs to reboot, or that it needs a new battery. It can also tell them which devices need maintenance or if the ones they have are working properly. And that can save companies a bundle.

On the flip side, there’s a software network that allows products to use small amounts of electricity over short distances to communicate with each other, so that products can do remote backups of data for days. And that type of software can also tell a battery maker that its product’s storage needs are ready for inspection and data gathering.

LimTrust works closely with companies that make power and other long-distance broadband connections. In the US, it works with companies like QUALCOMM, the telecoms equipment maker, and other companies that take broadband signal. In China, where huge amounts of internet traffic are exchanged daily, it works with companies like Huawei, one of the country’s top telecommunications equipment makers. Many of LimTrust’s clients have access to wealth beyond one’s wildest imaginations.

A big chunk of Americans get broadband access from big telecoms companies, like Verizon, AT&T and CenturyLink. They can get fast internet access for the equivalent of a local or regional cable company. LimTrust works closely with companies that can handle that interconnection but whose future is cloudy. If one of these companies has to move out of business or goes under or suffers a default, these companies could fall back on LimTrust for their connectivity needs. Those connectivity needs have skyrocketed in recent years, with global IP traffic nearly doubling between 2014 and 2016, according to the Global Internet Phenomena Study.

Many big companies are now trying to become more smart by handing over a deeper and deeper control of their operations to software. In some ways, this is a natural progression. From printing presses to the cellphone, software has controlled or transformed each new technological revolution in the past. The internet led to software-based workplace collaboration tools. Industrial internet of things (IIoT) started with the Internet of Things or, in the jargon, the internet of things (IoT). In the not-too-distant future, industrial internet companies will be able to hand over control of the stuff they make, and let software control those goods.

The money that big technology companies can make developing security systems in three dimensions means that their methods, like surveillance software, will ultimately be familiar to all. “The security or the tracking or even motion of people, or sensing anything, is in software already and is actually pretty good at it,” says Michael Courson, a co-founder of LimTrust. There may be decades of innovation required to implement such information or control system, but with a business shift from hardware to software, “that change will be rapid,” Courson says.

This story was provided by Business Insider, an AOL company.

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