Russian game bosses claim “invisible defence” against nuclear threat

BBC Global network of Russian gamers is racing to put out and prevent an alleged conspiracy theory that the start of a nuclear war would be broadcast live on the internet. The creators of…

Russian game bosses claim "invisible defence" against nuclear threat

BBC

Global network of Russian gamers is racing to put out and prevent an alleged conspiracy theory that the start of a nuclear war would be broadcast live on the internet.

The creators of video game Spawn, the latest title in its series, claim to have come up with a “invisible defence”.

Heavily encrypted characters can be carried by computer, USB dongles or smartphones, the developers explain.

The video is warning against their capture or discovery.

The game claims a “friendly” supercomputer belonging to Estonia has “set a trap” and is sending out thousands of files that will “take a year” to locate and decrypt.

It claims that computers and USB cards carrying the game or files will drop packets which the “brave” will need to defeat.

Spawn is a multiplayer online game in which players control the bodies of ravenous, disembodied stalks moving through a maze. It is one of the most popular multiplayer video games.

The game’s creators have been busy making disclaimers about “drugs, violence, political conspiracy and secret military units” in it.

They have also claimed that they are very careful with the weapons used, to make them easier to avoid finding and take down.

Launched two weeks ago, the game, which is available for free download, goes on to set out “problematic” scenarios such as schoolchildren using fire bombs during a fight between countrymen.

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