Iran and world powers to resume nuclear talks

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Iran and the UK agreed to improve their ties during Richard Holbrooke’s five-day visit in December 2010 Iran has agreed to resume talks with world powers on its nuclear…

Iran and world powers to resume nuclear talks

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Iran and the UK agreed to improve their ties during Richard Holbrooke’s five-day visit in December 2010

Iran has agreed to resume talks with world powers on its nuclear programme, more than a year after it suspended the nuclear agreement it struck with the West.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said Iran had informed the agency that it was “ready to engage with the IAEA on nuclear matters as part of its commitments under the JCPOA”.

The Islamic Republic said this was the first time such talks had been held since 2015.

The country said they would take place “immediately”, but did not specify dates.

Photo caption: Agencies report on the state of Iran’s nuclear program

Under the 2015 deal with the US, European Union, Britain, China, France and Russia, Iran agreed to limit its uranium enrichment programme to curb the risk of it being put to military use.

But the IAEA said Iran had made no progress in implementing its commitments.

Iran said in April that without a resolution to the case, it would re-impose full nuclear-related sanctions.

The Iranian government said it would continue to cooperate with the IAEA and try to resolve its outstanding concerns.

In June, the country’s Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, issued new guidelines telling the country’s negotiators to try to push the West to ensure that inspections of Iran’s nuclear programme were permanent.

Iran and the other signatories to the deal had given their four months’ notice on 6 May, meaning the terms were meant to expire in August.

However, under an extension deal agreed in May, this deadline has been extended for 90 days.

Image copyright EPA Image caption Iran announced it would resume nuclear talks in 2017 ©Julien M. Hekimian, AFP/Getty Images

The IAEA is expected to report by October whether Iran has met its commitments under the 2015 agreement.

It will determine Iran’s compliance after receiving reports from the country’s government, as well as the US, China, Russia, the UK, Germany and France.

Iran often tells the IAEA that if it receives reports on a nuclear-related deal, it wants them to give them until October rather than the five months as per the original 2015 agreement.

In June, the European Union agreed to extend an aviation ban on Iran to October 2019 in order to get a better deal from Tehran.

The nuclear deal was the only thing that kept Iran, a longstanding nuclear-armed power, in the arms control fold.

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