How would Biden fare in office under this president?

This week, former Vice President Joe Biden released his book, “Promise Me, Dad: A Year of Hope, Hardship, and Purpose.” But a big part of the book didn’t see the light of day: His…

How would Biden fare in office under this president?

This week, former Vice President Joe Biden released his book, “Promise Me, Dad: A Year of Hope, Hardship, and Purpose.” But a big part of the book didn’t see the light of day: His interview with CNN’s Fareed Zakaria.

I was a CNN political contributor when the interview was scheduled to take place, but it was canceled due to fallout from the Roy Moore scandal, which was making headlines at the time. Then, two days before the interview was scheduled to take place, Biden sent a tweet.

The controversy was over whether or not the allegations against Moore and the accusers at the time should make him unfit to serve as Alabama’s next Supreme Court Justice.

My takeaway from Biden’s tweet is twofold: First, it was important to take a stand, especially when the company his words were meant to represent is the company on which CNN depends for revenue. Second, it reinforced one of my biggest pet peeves about this moment in politics: the false equivalence Biden would be assigned to, as opposed to the president of the United States.

Allegations of sexual misconduct should not be used to redefine the President’s character. The former Vice President did the right thing and waited for the facts before speaking.

Biden’s Twitter feed has served as a breeding ground for thoughtful, important viewpoints. He is a distinguished politician and a courageous family man. The President has displayed nothing but abuse and intimidation in his position.

This isn’t to say there shouldn’t be a place for commentary in the heated debate that has consumed our nation. I frequently hear representatives of all political parties argue about how to fix this country. I’m sure Biden has got plenty of ideas to offer his fellow Republicans. There is value in all sides having ideas, and allowing people to differ.

But a powerful place to have conversations is while our congress is in session — not while the country is under siege, trying to make sense of a president who has much to say.

Just last week, the President was spotted grabbing his crotch while talking to a high school boy at a Boys & Girls Club of America event.

That same day, the Washington Post published a report indicating the President has admitted to sexually harassing women in the past.

So, this week, thousands of miles away from Washington, Biden took his time to share his thoughts. You can bet we were listening.

Vice President Biden’s interview with Fareed Zakaria was canceled, but one of his top political advisors said the upcoming issues of geopolitical and economic power were presented in a “risk-adjusted and richly thought out way.” Biden’s team said his message to the world would include his thoughts on foreign policy, national security, economic development and domestic policy.

How would Biden fare in office under the current president? How would it affect U.S. foreign policy? Would Hillary Clinton govern from a different playbook?

As an ardent fan of the Vice President, I’d love to hear his take on those questions, but with this news they’re now at least on hold.

President and CEO of HLN, Lauren Zalaznick is a television and media visionary and one of Time’s Most Influential People. Her prominent role in the entertainment, business and entertainment world and her work to address environmental and social issues created Time magazine’s World’s Most Influential Woman in 2009. She previously served as President of Entertainment at NBC from 2002-2007.

This article was written by Lauren Zalaznick and originally published on HLN.

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