Facebook plans location-based app with strangers who will discover it if you like the right restaurant

Facebook users were delighted this week when the company announced a new location-based Facebook app that reportedly gives users the ability to vote on a new restaurant or bakery. It’s a subtle move, of…

Facebook plans location-based app with strangers who will discover it if you like the right restaurant

Facebook users were delighted this week when the company announced a new location-based Facebook app that reportedly gives users the ability to vote on a new restaurant or bakery. It’s a subtle move, of course, since locations already appear on the News Feed for some users. While Facebook still has the most trafficked social network in the world, the design issues are all over Twitter. One concern: Facebook will display advertisements instead of content on location-based products.

The marketer: Coke Zero Sugar

The brand: Coca-Cola

The problem: Its logo

“We’re not changing our bottle, just our name,” the company wrote in its official statement. “We’ve been using the Coke Zero Sugar name for a number of years.” That doesn’t mean Coca-Cola doesn’t recognize it can use a simpler name for the product. Coke Zero Ice Cream was briefly a marketer success, until being replaced in 2014, after consumers noticed the two products could be confused. When Facebook said that it’s not going to change its logo, it also implied it’s not responsible for managing the fact that “Facebook” could possibly be used in the same sentence as “Coke Zero Sugar.”

The marketer: LG

The brand: LG

The problem: Its messiah

In 2013, LG released a crossover from its product name and real-world roots in new product devices and devices that became known as “The Next LabEL.”

The marketer: Ann Taylor

The brand: Ann Taylor

The problem: Its own problem

The Ann Taylor real-life labels print on T-shirts sold on its website alongside the logo. Here’s the problem.

The marketer: Allstate

The brand: Allstate

The problem: The company’s name

Allstate was once a big name for homeowners insurance. It stopped supporting the line in 2014 and now operates only through its Allstate brand, which was founded in 1922 as a rural automobile insurer.

The marketer: Wrigley

The brand: Wrigley

The problem: Its brand

The new name in 2010 made it clear that Wrigley still operates under its namesake brand, rather than as a more general type of candy confection.

The marketer: One

The brand: One

The problem: Not a problem, is it?

One, an acronym for “the original Name Company,” is a major name in publishing circles and is known for its book cover designs. It has done so under several different names: One was inspired by the brand’s flagship novel, “One Fine Day,” and includes one of its writers, Hannah Jane Parkinson. The other changed the name to One Design, and is sold as part of a consumer-facing subscription service that gives subscribers the rights to certain covers.

There are problems for both of these companies. One has been forced to change its name to its own brand, and one stands to miss out on $35 million in sales that are also affected by the nomenclature.

Leave a Comment